Tag Archives: horror

New release: Myths, Monsters, Mutations

The fine people at Jay Henge have brought out another specfic anthology in time for the holidays!

The blurb for Myths, Monsters, Mutatations is:

Myths, tales of monsters, mutations of what’s real. Our entire history of storytelling, of myth and lore, of what we pass on to our children, and share around the campfire, has included stories of monsters. From the bogey-men and devils who will eat you if you go out at night, to the gods and demigods waiting to be offended by some small slight, to the sinister mutations and impostors who try to fool us, to the monsters we harbor deep in our own hearts—all find a place within these pages.

My contributions is a short office horror story called ‘Passive Aggressive’, about the insidious evil of passive aggression in offices…

Angie feels her blood vibrating like water on the skin of a drum. A timpani throb. She feels full of tremors.
She feels hollow.
The hollowness is singing.

Buy Myths, Monsters, Mutations

News: Horror story sale to Jay Henge

I’m delighted to announce that my short horror story, “Passive Aggressive”, has been accepted for Jay Henge’s next anthology, Myths, Monsters, Muations.

I’ve also had a science fiction story accepted for their following anthology, Wavelengths, though the cover isn’t yet available for that one.

Jay Henge creates entertaining themed anthologies. I have works in two other anthologies – “Death’s Door” in Intrepid Horizons about a young poet’s odd relationship with the Grim Reaper, and “Show and Tell” in Encounters – where it’s a possessed mummy hand versus Class 1B and the odds are pretty even.

I’m not sure yet of the release date for Myths, Monsters, Mutations, but in the meantime you can find these other JayHenge anthologies:

Review: And Then… Volume 1

I do love an adventure story. I love them even more when they feature two people adventuring together. They don’t have to be two human people – just two beings having mutual adventures is very much my jam. It’s the main appeal of the Sherlock Holmes stories for me, and it’s the reason I was so delighted to have a story accepted into Clan Destine Press’s And Then… anthology last year.

Volume One of the anthology was published in December 2016. It contains my story, ‘Virgin Soil‘, a tale of gold rush shenanigans, dark magic, monsters and a shapeshifting man/rat.

My delight has grown exponentially by seeing my name in the Table of Contents alongside so many writers I admire. There I am, nestled between Peter M Ball and Dan Rabarts, whose story here, ‘Tipuna Tapu’, has just won the Paul Haines Award for Long Fiction in the 2016 AHWA Australian Shadows Awards! I couldn’t be happier.

Although linked as adventure stories featuring dynamic duos, all written by Australasian authors, the settings and themes of the fiction in And Then… are otherwise a gorgeous sprawl across time and genre. Historical, contemporary, fantastical and futuristic in turns, in all kinds of locales, And Then… is a sparkling hoard of treasure.

A few of my favourite gems:

I loved the gritty noir feel of both Jason Nahrung’s ‘The Mermaid Club’ and Peter M Ball’s ‘Deadbeat’. Jason Franks ‘Exli and the Dragon’, with one protagonist essentially a sentient pillow, is witty and surprising, and displays Franks’s characteristic energy and originality. Lucy Sussex takes us to the jungle in ‘Batgirl in Borneo’, and is as always wry, clever and thoughtful. The collection is rounded out with Tansy Rayner Roberts’ ‘Death at the Dragon Circus’, a story of teeth and ways of flying, but also fondness and the search for a place to be yourself.

Each story in this anthology could easily be the launching pad for a series, and I’d happily spend more time with all these adventurers and the worlds they inhabit. Perhaps we can encourage the writers to do just that!

In the meantime, there’s And Then… Volume 1, with volume 2 to come, and all these worlds of adventure to explore.

Buy And Then… Volume 1

Review: Caution: Contains Small Parts by Kirstyn McDermott (AWW Challenge #11)

smallpartsThe 12 Planets series from Twelfth Planet Press continues to deliver brilliant stories from amazing women writers. (Yes, I know I have a book in that collection. Please excuse the hubris. The company I share in this series makes me giddy with glee!) Kirstyn McDermott’s Caution: Contains Small Parts, the ninth in the series, is another publication of excellence.

McDermott has a real skill for sneaking up on you with her horror, and then for taking you in unexpected directions. Scenarios you think will be full of gore and terror end up strangely sad and sweet; those who seem like victims might just be perpetrators of a different kind; those who seem cruel may simply have a different perspective. Human motivation is complex, so the relationship of an individual and the strange world they inhabit may not be what you think.

I want to avoid spoilers, and sometimes the shift in perspective offered in these stories is subtle, so in this respect I’ll keep my comments short and possibly cryptic. So… the title story, Caution: Contains Small Parts is possibly my favourite for becoming not at all what I expected, and moving me deeply in the process. As a writer, Horn creeped me out the most as a cautionary tale of unintended consequences. The resolution of What Amanda Wants was horrific, and I feel like maybe I’m a terrible person for finding it so satisfying as well.  The Home For Broken Dolls is sad and lonely, and the elements of what are superficially horror just feel like a personification of justifiable “I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take it any longer” rage that ends in a wonderful sense of hope rather than destruction.

I’m not sure how useful that is to you, but honestly, the 12 Planets series is good value for money, individually or as a subscription, so I recommend you just go on over to the site and buy this one, then buy the rest, and wait for the tenth to be released.